How to set soft goals and measure soft results

Achieving results is a walk in the park compared to navigating the fuzzy side of leadership. Measuring success is even more difficult.

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The soft stuff:

  1. Building relationships.
  2. Managing energy.
  3. Staying curious.

Technical skills become less valuable and relational skills become more valuable the longer you lead.

Overcoming feelings of hypocrisy:

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  1. Be transparent with intention. ‘I’m working to be a better connector.’
  2. Reflect on motivation. Perhaps mutual enrichment is enough motivation to elevate you above feeling like a hypocrite because you set a goal of three personal conversations a day.
  3. Accept, even express frailties. ‘I’m just not good at showing appreciation. I’m working on it this month. I feel appreciative. It’s just hard to express.’

Transparency answers feelings of hypocrisy when learning new behaviors.

Soft goals:

  1. Ask two questions before making any statements.
  2. Go on a gratitude walkabout three times a week.
  3. Learn what motivates the people on your team – one person a day.
  4. Monitor energy in individuals. Inquire when you see energy dip or rise. ‘What just happened for you?’

Measuring the soft stuff:

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  1. Measure behaviors. ‘I’m giving one personal affirmation every day.’
  2. Explore impact. Are people more or less energized when you’re around, for example?
  3. Enjoy results.

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